vnmsprdr.

Anika. 22.

shrimpfur:

Once you start dating someone its like, impossible to insult them

"suck my dick" ok

“bite me” hell yeah

"kiss my ass" sure

(via amechercheur)

I notice everything. And by everything I literally mean everything. I notice when someone stops hitting me up like they used to. I notice when the way someone talks to me starts changing. I notice the little things that people do and the little things they used to do. I notice when things change and when it’s no longer the same. I notice every single little detail. I just don’t say anything.

(Source: dinhtheresa, via thecolorofviolence)

Never understood the obsession with callin dude’s “whipped” for catering to your chick. Like, if you know you have someone special, there is nothing unmanly about making sure she feels that way 24/7.

—timothy delaghetto (via desideriumxx)

(via helainetieu)

arabellesicardi:

skinny people mad over nicki minaj’s lyrics, please multiply your feelings by 24/7 and then u will perhaps understand a little bit what thick girls may be going thru when your bodies are the ones that are served in stores, represented, desired and glorified……you can cope with 1 song not about u…………….we can do it together. i believe in u 

(via amechercheur)

bonnyrotten:

sharpbriar:

malformalady:

Images of caskets that popped out of the saturated soil during the Flood of ‘94 still haunts many who went through the disaster two decades ago.
(Albany Herald file photo)


A scene from all over Georgia.

Georgia.

bonnyrotten:

sharpbriar:

malformalady:

Images of caskets that popped out of the saturated soil during the Flood of ‘94 still haunts many who went through the disaster two decades ago.

(Albany Herald file photo)

A scene from all over Georgia.

Georgia.

(via setyoursails)

These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via ethiopienne)

BOOOM.  Read this if you are a dude, please.

(via geekyjessica)

Yesssssss.

(via quothtehblackbirdnevermoar)

(via wickedclothes)